Samsung Windows 8 tablet revealed at Build 2011

But only for developers
Samsung Windows 8 tablet revealed at Build 2011

It may have leaked before?Steven Sinofsky’s keynote at Microsoft's Build 2011 conference, but it has been revealed that the much anticipated Samsung Windows 8 tablet will be solely for developers. For the time being, at least.

The new device will be given away to developers in order for them to test and create applications. It will come with the Developers' Preview build of Windows 8 pre-installed, and offers up the ability to develop and use the software at the same time.

With these functions in mind, it comes with healthy specifications: a second generation Intel Core i5 processor, Samsung Super PLS 1366 x 768 touchscreen display (that looks to be 10.1-inch, but not officially revealed), integrated 3G (with AT&T; supplying 2GB per month for an entire year), UEFI BIOS, 4GB of DDR3 RAM, and a 64GB SSD hard drive. Phew.

The tablet also sports in-built sensors, USB connectivity, a microSD slot, HDMI socket and a stylus. It comes with a dock that also features a USB port, HDMI connection and Ethernet. And the whole shebang supports multiple monitors.

It weighs 909g, measures 11.6-inch from corner to corner and is 12.9mm thick.

Sadly, there are no plans at present to unleash it onto the public, but it does look an awful lot like the Samsung Series 7 Slate PC that we saw a few weeks back, so we can only hope.

Related links:

Tags: Tablets Windows Windows 8 Microsoft Samsung

Samsung Windows 8 tablet revealed at Build 2011 originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Tue, 13 Sep 2011 18:45:00 +0100

THX-certification coming for mobile phones and tablets – maybe an app too?

EXCLUSIVE: SVP Rick Dean explains all
THX senior vice president Rick Dean

For many audiophiles and home cinema buffs, if a product, Blu-ray disc or cinema presentation has the THX badge applied, it will offer the best video and audio performance possible.

The company, set up as an off-shoot of George Lucas' Lucasfilm, is possibly best known for certifying high-end and mid-range AV amplifiers, home cinema speaker systems, and, more recently, PC speakers and, even, flatscreen TVs. Now, as Pocket-lint has exclusively learnt, it is to turn to mobile phones and tablet devices.

Speaking to us in a one-to-one briefing, senior vice president of THX (and chairman of the [email protected] Consortium), Rick Dean, explained that as smartphones and tablets, such as the iPhone and iPad, are becoming more and more important for content delivery, his company needs to look at ways to improve the experience for users: "We are actively going down that path right now," he said.

"Five years ago, I said that we should really get into the mobile audio world, but they said, 'You can’t get a theatrical experience out of that, you’re listening to it with earbuds.'

"But look at the way that music is consumed today," he added. "And it’s got to the point where I know I can work with a company who makes phones like these here [iPhone 4s]. Maybe produce an app that will improve the user experience.

"Although, there’s only so much you can do with a screen this size."

More important to the company, then, is the fact that modern mobile devices now hook up to a big screen, and more and more consumers are using them as media players.

And it is here that THX hopes to help manufacturers improve performance: "There are things that can be done that can enhance that experience – the clever use of compression technologies, the clever use of DSP (digital signal processing) which can sense the effect of compression on audio and video and try to restore a little of that sharpness," Dean told us.

However, at present, how THX works with smartphone and tablet manufacturers to bring about better audio and video quality is open. Ideally, it would like to both certify handsets and provide licensed software - such as?Media Director?(metadata stored within content to tell a device to choose optimum picture and sound settings) - to companies: "Whether it’s certification, or whether it’s technology licensing, we’re very much working on both of those worlds," said Dean.

No timescale has been mentioned, but, if you're as big home cinema fans as we are on Pocket-lint, we're sure that you too will be as excited that THX is readily turning its attention to phones and tablets.

Tags: Phones Tablets THX Rick Dean THX Media Director Interviews Mobile phone apps

THX-certification coming for mobile phones and tablets - maybe an app too? originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Mon, 05 Sep 2011 12:41:00 +0100

Samsung Galaxy Note hands-on

IFA 2011: A note pad, not a notepad
Samsung Galaxy Note hands-on

It's hard to know exactly how to describe the Samsung Galaxy Note. It's not a smartphone, it's not a tablet, in fact, it's probably more like a media player, but boy does it do much much more.

For starters, it has a meaty 5.3-inch screen - a Super AMOLED one at that. And we can happily reveal that it is by far the most gorgeous mobile device screen we've seen. It pings with a colourfield so vibrant that your eyes will be thanking you for months.

However, that's not the Note's major USP...

Nope, the Note is suitably named, as well as being an Android Gingerbread (2.3.5) device, it comes with a stylus and applications that - in HTC Flyer style - combine to allow you to scribble, jot, doodle and sketch to your heart's content. But rather than a capacitive affair, as found with styli for the iPad and Samsung's own Tab series, the Note's pen is much more like a, er, pen.

For starters, it is capable of drawing or writing in different weights of line depending on how much pressure is used. In many ways, in use it reminds us of a professional light pen for a PC, and we can see the whole kit and caboodle appealing to creatives and artists from the bat.

The only downside, at present, is that the software is clearly not finished yet. There's S-Memo, which allows you to scribble on a virtual notepad, but it sometimes suffers from glitches and can also be hampered by the on-screen line staggering behind the physical pen strokes. We're sure, though, that come release it will be fixed.

In addition, there's an SDK available for developers to create their own apps for use with the stylus. And then we reckon the capabilities of the Note will be better realised.

At present, however, it is bursting full of potential and, if nothing else, is a beautiful looking personal media player and pocket-sized portal to the world wide wonderweb.

Pricing and release date are yet to be announced.?Watch out for Pocket-lint's First Look Review soon.

Tags: Samsung Tablets Samsung Galaxy Note IFA2011 Photos

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Samsung Galaxy Note hands-on originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Thu, 01 Sep 2011 15:53:00 +0100

Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 hands-on

IFA 2011: 10.1's baby brother
Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 hands-on

Lighter than a super model's lunchbox and faster than a kid full of Sherbet Dib Dabs, the Galaxy Tab 7.7 is Samsung's second foray into the market with a 7-inch tablet device, and this time it seems as if it's bang on the money.

Last year was perhaps too soon to try to buck the screen size trend set by Apple with the original iPad; 7 inches in display real estate just seemed puny in comparison, while the first Galaxy Tab also had a waistline that was almost as wide as it was long. In short, short was a mistake.

This time however, from our 15 minutes or so play during the press day at the IFA consumer electronics convention, lessons have not just been learned, they've been implemented.

With this year's diminutive model, we've seen Farley's Rusks that are thicker and heavier. At 333g for the Wi-Fi version (335g for the 3G) you barely notice that you're holding it. Last year, Samsung was touting the Tab as a handbag device, this year it is better placed to fulfil that promise.

Indeed, it's almost like swiping away and interacting with a magician's comedy playing card.

That's not to say that it's shy on tech in its bowels. The 1.4GHz processor keeps things whipping along nicely. In some respects, we'd even say that it is faster than the Galaxy Tab 10.1, but we weren't able to directly compare as we didn't have one to hand at the show.

There's also a 3-megapixel rear-facing camera with an LED flash, and a 2-megapixel front-facing webcam for video conferencing.

Having only a brief play, there's no way to guarantee battery life, but as it's of the 5,100mAh variety, we'd expect there to be plenty of juice for lengthy playtime.

Naturally, software-wise, as the device utilises Android 3.2 (Honeycomb), it works exactly like its bigger sibling, and the model displayed at IFA offered up few surprises for those familiar with the Google operating system. The only major change was the use of the smaller screen - instead of just making the homescreen widgets smaller, and therefore harder to read, they take up more space than their 10.1 equivalents. Funnily enough, this makes it look busier and more packed with features, so that's no bad thing.

The last thing of note (until we review the device) is that although the design, with its gorgeous brushed metal back and wafer thin girth, is as good as it gets, the final product could end up being different - something noted on the rear of the display sample.

Not that Samsung would like it to change, of course. It just may not have a choice, if Apple gets its wicked way.

It is also for this reason that we still have no confirmation on price or release date. But don't think we don't see the irony in going hands-on with the tablet in the very country that its stablemates are injuncted.

Tags: Samsung Tablets IFA2011 Samsung Galaxy Tab 7-7 Samsung Galaxy Tab Photos

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Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 hands-on originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Thu, 01 Sep 2011 14:47:00 +0100

iPhone not Stephen Fry’s greatest gadget

It is... a lighter???
iPhone not Stephen Fry's greatest gadget

The iPhone, and smartphones generally, only came a paltry 13th in Stephen Fry's 100 Greatest Gadgets - a TV show aired by Channel 4 in the UK yesterday. And the self-confessed Apple fanboy revealed that the iPad (10th) and iPod (3rd) were also beaten by... A lighter. A normal, basic, cheap lighter.

Usually, Channel 4's 100 polls are open to a public vote beforehand, giving UK citizens the chance to see their favourites top the list, however, this time, the choices were up to celebrity gadgeteer Fry himself. As the dedicated web page puts it, the show was entirely, "Stephen Fry choosing and presenting his all-time favourite gadgets."

Fry explained that he chose the lighter as his all-time greatest gadget for its historical importance: "It's not the order in which things are invented that makes them the most impressive, it's the importance they have to humanity. So my number one is this: fire with a flick of the fingers."

And while he may have a point, it's his definition of "gadget" that seems to have confused many who watched the programme. Among his list he also includes the pen, an apple peeler (ooo, he's such an Apple fanboy), a corkscrew and a whistle... No, really.

Of the other devices we cover on Pocket-lint, the eReader (such as the Amazon Kindle) did the worst. It came a mere 99th, three places below a garlic press.

We kid you not.

Tags: Apple Tablets Phones Gadgets Stephen Fry Channel 4 iPhone iPad

iPhone not Stephen Fry's greatest gadget originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Tue, 30 Aug 2011 11:35:00 +0100

10 alternative uses for an ?89 HP TouchPad

Not just a dirt cheap tablet
10 alternate uses for an £89 HP TouchPad

When HP announced it was abandoning webOS and the price of the HP TouchPad plummeted in some stores to the ridiculously generous ?89, it caused such a frenzied rush to nab one that few stopped to think about what they'd do with it when it arrived.

After all, one of the reasons behind HP's decision was that it couldn't garner the same sort of support from third-party developers for its operating system?as iOS or Android, even when it was putting huge quantities of time, money and effort behind the platform. What chance do new applications have of appearing on the futurely unsupported OS now?

Perhaps the bargain-lust had skewed tech junkies' common sense radars? Certainly, even in Pocket-lint Towers, the idea of a newly launched tablet device for the same price as a ticket to see the rowing at the London Olympics seemed attractive enough to have us cursing Amazon and Dixons for checkout hang-ups.

And, to be honest, we all still secretly want one, even though the firesale frenzy has calmed down. So, if you've just had an HP TouchPad popped through your letter box after buying one without thinking, then here's 10 ideas of what to do with it.

Car headrest media player

There are several companies, such as US company ViewSticks (who ship worldwide), that sell mounts to strap tablet devices to the back of car headrests. So, therefore, you could always consider utilising your HP TouchPad as a rear-facing media player to keep kids or other passengers entertained while you wend your way at 10 miles per hour around the M25.

You'll have to install an app to play the more common movie video files (DivX, XviD, WMV or MKV), with one suggestion being?KalemSoft Media Player v0.3.3 for TouchPad, but other than that, at least you can drag and drop files from your computer without a client.

Comic book reader

Ever since the TouchPad dropped in price, comic book forums have been awash with comments from collectors and fans who see the device as a great, relatively inexpensive reader. Yeah, it's heavier and clunkier than an iPad or Galaxy Tab 10.1, but for those lucky enough to have their transactions go through, it's also around ?400 cheaper.

When loaded with the app ComicShelf HD (available for around $1.99), the TouchPad can read .cbr and .cbz files, the most commonly used types for comic book scans and renders (both legal and illegal). You might even fancy scanning in your own comics in order to keep them all in the one place, and therefore readable at any time. That way, you can keep the originals in their pristine placky bags.

Gossip grapevine

Sitting down in front of X-Factor and you fancy having a rant about?Tulisa Contostavlos' hair? Why not pick up your social media slab and post your thoughts onto Twitter? Need gossip and tittle tattle on a constant basis? Just leave the client on permanently (bar a recharge every now and then) and you'll get a?persistently?updated stream of inanity, er, sorry, important views and opinion.

For many, the tastefully titled Spaz HD is the best Twitter client for TouchPad out there, it's open source, also works with Identi.ca and StatusNet, and is, most importantly, free.

Electronic recipe database

Says it all really. The screen is, kind-of, wipe clean (by which we mean, if you get a light amount of flour on it, you can brush it off easily - not that you could smear it in melted chocolate and then expect it to work). It can store plenty of recipes with pictures and everything. And, it's sturdy enough to keep racked alongside other kitchen books.

You could pay for one of the few recipe apps available, such as iCookbook (with its 2,000 recipes), tune it to one of the many Internet cooking sites (as long as you have Wi-Fi), or even scan all of your own recipes and store them on the TouchPad in JPG format.

Memo pad

Stick the TouchPad to your fridge and have the TapNote for TouchPad application permanently loaded. It costs $5, but is thought by many to be the best note-making software for the tablet. The family can then type shopping lists or other thoughts using the tablet's on-screen keypad.

It even has Dropbox support, so you can sync your notes with a PC or Mac.

Put Android on it

WebOS is dead ... long live Android, or at least that is the theory. Footage of TouchPads running?Cyanogen mod 7 and an almost totally unusable version of Google's Honeycomb operating system have started making an appearance on the Internet. Similarly YouTube has begun to fill with Gingerbread-toting HP tablets, admittedly running a lot smoother.?

The end of WebOS brings with it the end of application development, homebrew apps aside, which in time will make your currently oh so fresh TouchPad rapidly descend into app-less boredomsville. Adding Android however will bring with it access to the sort of applications that people who have shelled out hundreds for a conventional tablet get.?

For ?89 (if you managed to pick one up) we can't think of a much better Android tablet. The closest thing to the TouchPad in the specs department is something like the Motorola Xoom or Samsung Galaxy Tab, which costs around ?479.?

Use it as a placemat

Imagine heading round to a friends house for dinner only to discover they have replaced conventional placemats with TouchPads. This would result in instant social brownie points and uber dinner party bragging rights.

It could mean browsing the football results while waiting for pudding or even indulging in a dinner game of Pocket-lint's own invention that sees you racing each other to see whose tablet can load a web page faster.

A word of warning however; try and opt for more solid and less sticky foods, TouchPads are particularly unhappy when covered in ice cream of immersed in cereal bowls.?

Have your very own GuestPad

If you are the sort of person that enjoys the benefit of having a guest wing in your country estate, or perhaps employs a butler, you could provide them with their own special GuestPad.?

The idea behind this one is that you place the TouchPad by guests' bedsides or in the bathroom (perhaps as part of a shampoo/soap display). Those interested in giving the TouchPad a go can pick it up and have a play and will be amazed by your tech savvy household, while kept under the illusion you are filthy rich. If you are, however, genuinely filthy rich, then perhaps filling every room with iPads is a better idea.

Use it as a new kitchen radio

A decent DAB powered radio can set you back plenty more than the ?89 you shelled out for your TouchPad, so why not take advantage of the Wi-Fi radio it can offer. Simply leave the TouchPad with BBC iPlayer running and you have an almost instant way of either catching up or listening live to television or radio.

The Beats Audio technology inside the TouchPad also means that it has a relatively decent volume and sound quality. While it might not be proper kitchen radio levels of noise, what other ?89 sound systems can you check emails and browse the Internet on?

Wall mounted photo frame

Things can get plenty boring walls-wise when it comes to home decorating, so why not "spice up your life" with a wall mounted TouchPad acting as an interactive photo frame.?

You could even opt for a Pre3 and use the Touchstone technology to simply tap the frame with new content whenever you got bored of what was sitting on there already.

Things could get even more exciting if you opted for a hall mounted TouchPad, as you could use it to show custom?embarrassing?photo sets from visitors' Facebooks just as they step through the door.?

There are reports of the TouchPad having a slightly dim screen and we imagine constant recharging and battery life would likely cause you to get bored of the TouchPad/photo frame concept. Still for a while you would be able to say you had a tablet PC mounted on your wall.?

Related links:

Tags: Tablets HP HP TouchPad webOS webos apps Features

10 alternative uses for an £89 HP TouchPad originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:32:00 +0100

Tim Cook: Apple not going to change

Email to staff leaked
Tim Cook: Apple not going to change

Tim Cook, Apple's new CEO now that Steve Jobs has officially passed on the flame, has emailed the company's staff to say that everything will be business as usual. Rather than upset the apple cart (ahem), Cook explained in the message that "Apple is not going to change", and that "together we will continue to make Apple the magical place that it is".

The leaked email was sent to Ars Technica from one of its trusted sources, and the headers have been checked to validate its content. Also, to be honest, considering the content, it'd be a pretty wishy-washy fake considering that Cook says all the right things to settle the staff. It's just a wonder why this wasn't released publicly, in order to allay share holders' fears.

Nonetheless, here's the email in full (bar the "Team" start, and "Tim" sign off):

"I am looking forward to the amazing opportunity of serving as CEO of the most innovative company in the world. Joining Apple was the best decision I've ever made and it's been the privilege of a lifetime to work for Apple and Steve for over 13 years. I share Steve's optimism for Apple's bright future.

"Steve has been an incredible leader and mentor to me, as well as to the entire executive team and our amazing employees. We are really looking forward to Steve's ongoing guidance and inspiration as our Chairman.

"I want you to be confident that Apple is not going to change. I cherish and celebrate Apple's unique principles and values. Steve built a company and culture that is unlike any other in the world and we are going to stay true to that—it is in our DNA. We are going to continue to make the best products in the world that delight our customers and make our employees incredibly proud of what they do.

"I love Apple and I am looking forward to diving into my new role. All of the incredible support from the Board, the executive team and many of you has been inspiring. I am confident our best years lie ahead of us and that together we will continue to make Apple the magical place that it is."

Interesting times ahead...

Read

Tags: Apple Steve Jobs Phones Tablets iPad iPhone Tim Cook

Tim Cook: Apple not going to change originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Thu, 25 Aug 2011 16:41:00 +0100

Steve Jobs’ resignation from Apple: Industry reaction

We ask the experts
Steve Jobs resignation from Apple: Industry reaction

So, Steve Jobs has finally stepped down as Apple CEO, and while it may not have come as a massive surprise, the announcement has still had a profound effect on the world of technology - not least, Apple's own share price.

But, that's in the short term; what is more interesting, perhaps, is how it will affect the consumer electronics industry going forward. At the time that Bill Gates stepped down from the helm of Microsoft, that particular company was considered, if not the number one technology firm globally, definitely there or thereabouts.

However, after Gates' resignation, other companies, such as Intel, Google and, of course, Apple overtook Microsoft in valuation and, for many, innovation.

Could we see the same happen to Apple, now that its creative and?charismatic?figurehead is no longer steering the ship?

We asked several industry experts for their opinions on the imminent and?far flung?future of Apple, or even just their thoughts on Steve Jobs himself, and this is what they said...

David Phelan, gadgets editor, Time Out

"It's hard to imagine a post-Jobs Apple, but Tim Cook is clearly hugely capable and effective - the last eight months of Jobs's absence have shown that. We haven't seen enough of Cook (anything of him) to know yet how charismatic he may be, or whether he will inspire like Jobs did. And every little thing that goes wrong will be labelled as something that wouldn't have happened under Steve Jobs. But it's the products that matter and they're still being designed by that other Apple genius, Jonathan Ive.

"Ive and a safe pair of hands in Tim Cook is still a pretty compelling combination."

Mark Prigg, science and technology editor, Evening Standard

"The changes within the company are likely to be minimal, having been quietly put into place over the last few years as Jobs' health faltered. In the short and medium term, it's very much business as usual, although questions do remain over where the next long term 'visionary' products such as the iPad will come from.

"It's difficult to imagine Apple without Jobs, but he is leaving behind a team moulded in his own image, and crucially, a team that now has something to prove. It is the end of an era for Apple, and for computing in general, but also the beginning of a new, post-Jobs Apple that can now move forward in earnest without the constant questions over Steve Jobs' health."

Seth?Weintraub, founder, 9to5mac

"I think everyone who watches Apple was expecting this day to come soon. That didn't take away from the shock of the news, however.

"Jobs isn't gone, though reading around the web makes it feel that way. In reality, nothing will have changed in the short term. Tim Cook will continue doing what he's been doing. Jobs will too. I noticed operations guy Jeff Williams was promoted to Bios page a few months ago. I imagine that when the COO-CEO shift really happened.

"I'm glad he's slowing down and easing himself out of Apple. I know he loves the company, but it would also be good for him to get a healthy retirement and get some 'me' time.

"Apple will be fine."

Will Findlater, editor, Stuff

"It’s a sad day for Apple, but it’s by no means the end. Steve Jobs played a pivotal role in Apple’s wild success over the past 15 years, and his legendary keynote product announcements made him tech’s biggest celebrity, but Apple’s product triumphs have always been a team effort. As long as the Apple team maintains the path Steve trod, we’ll keep seeing envelope-pushing products.

"I don’t think Steve Jobs’ resignation will have too great an impact on the wider industry. For those outside of tech’s inner sanctum it’s Apple’s products that have done the talking. People aren’t going to stop buying iPhones just because the man who introduced them to the world has taken a new role at the company that makes them, and if Apple can continue to innovate, it’ll remain the thought leader of the gadget world."

Luke Peters, editor, T3

"While Jobs’ resignation as CEO will be a momentous loss for Apple, there’s no question that the brand will continue to wow consumers and the industry. Roadmaps detailing product and service launches for the next decade (at least) will have been cemented and Tim Cook will be fully primed to run the ship as Steve sees fit.

"The big question, though, is whether Jobs’ attention to detail, creativity and vision for the future - the elements that have made Apple what it is today - will still be part of the corporation’s ethic in years to come?"

Misha Lyalin, CEO, Zeptolab, Cut the Rope developer

"Steve Jobs was a phenomenal CEO for Apple and has made a lasting impression not just on the company and its employees but with Apple fanboys around the world. We, along with many others, are sad to see him leave his post.

"That said, I firmly believe that Apple's drive towards ground-breaking technology will continue live on and someone at Apple will pay as close attention to every little detail as Steve Jobs."

Mark Rogers, general manager, Cygnett UK & Europe

"Steve Jobs has been an incredible force in putting Apple where it is today and we're sure he will be sorely missed. His health and wellbeing has to be the greater priority though and although, in the short term, the markets may well react negatively to his moving, I'm sure that his legacy is not only in the products and software that he's created, but also in the people who will step up and carry on his great work."

Kristian Kr?yer, creative director, Libratone

"No matter if you are one of the Apple faithful or not,?it's beyond any question that this man has done more than anyone else for consumer electronic users worldwide. The brand has raised the bar for what users can expect from products in terms ease-of-use, design and function.

"Without Steve Jobs, I think we would have been fighting with consumer electronics products that were at a far lower standard then we have now. Apple design is a way of thinking that has been adapted by many brands and designers, including myself. That will stay the same no matter what title Jobs has in the organisation."

Peter Bowles, creative managing director, Dynamo PR

"The timing of Steve Jobs standing down as CEO seems to be carefully orchestrated to nicely stoke up enthusiasm for Apple just before a big iPhone 5 announcement. The clues have been there all year that Jobs isn't very well - his biography release date being moved around, as an indicator. So, I think that Apple has held back this announcement and timed this to perfection for publicity. It has a trick up its sleeves.

"However, Apple hasn't made the most of his resignation letter (which has been quoted in full worldwide) to alleviate shareholders fears. What a great opportunity to talk up (and more properly) introduce Tim Cook to the media. Apple could have problems moving forwards without Jobs as it has built its brand around him and needs to more fully get the media warmed up to Tim Cook being the new Apple CEO. He's hardly a household name yet.

"Jobs' legacy is clear and I think the comparisons with Thomas Edison and Benjamin Franklin are apt. Any pro-Apple comments on Pocket-lint, the BBC or Guardian usually get met by a slew of Apple-hating spam, so to them I would say this - you have lived in an era with a complete genius who has changed the way you interact with the very computer you're tapping away at - appreciate that fact!"

Stuart Miles, founder, Pocket-lint

"What effect will Steve Jobs leaving his CEO role at Apple have? In the short term, none. Apple will have been planning for this day for a very long time and his DNA will have been imprinted on the company, its employees and the way they think for years to come.?

"Jobs’ greatest achievement at Apple wasn’t the attention to detail in its products, but the attention to detail in creating a team that can continue his legacy. Disney is no less Disney now that Walt isn’t there. Why? Because it continues to run on the principles he envisioned from the beginning.?

"The doubt will come, however, if Apple as a company allows those plans to run dry, the people to leave, or the Jobs magic to fade."

Stephen Fry, celebrity gadget fan and blogger

Tweet by @stephenfry: "Terribly upset at the thought of Steve Jobs not feeling well enough to be CEO. Wishing him all the very very best…

"I post this again without apology: just one example of this extraordinary man's enduring qualities:?http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1R-jKKp3NA".

Steve Jobs, chairman of the board, Apple

"I believe Apple’s brightest and most?innovative?days are ahead of it."

Tags: Apple Steve Jobs Phones Tablets iPhone iPad

Steve Jobs' resignation from Apple: Industry reaction originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Thu, 25 Aug 2011 14:51:00 +0100

Apple Store down… hacked?

No products inbound
Apple Store down... hacked?

Usually, when the Apple Store webpage goes down there's two things you can expect. Firstly, that the store page will be replaced with the company's standard Post-it note holding screen saying "be back soon". And secondly, it will be having a refresh for a new product.

Today however, the online Apple Store has gone down globally with neither. We're not expecting any new products this early (the next one will most likely be the iPhone 5 in September/October), and instead of going to the holding page, we're faced with time out messages from our respective browsers.

Of course, this leads to another conclusion; could the largest tech company in the world have been hacked? Has the store been taken down because Anonymous, LulzSec or some other self-titled group of hacktivists have?targeted?Apple?

At present, nothing is coming out of Cupertino in relation to the downtime. Needless to say, we're currently trying to speak to our contacts to see exactly what's going on... Stay tuned.

Tags: Apple Online Phones Tablets Apple Store mac

Apple Store down... hacked? originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Wed, 17 Aug 2011 15:24:00 +0100

Apple Store down… hacked?

No products inbound
Apple Store down... hacked?

Usually, when the Apple Store webpage goes down there's two things you can expect. Firstly, that the store page will be replaced with the company's standard Post-it note holding screen saying "be back soon". And secondly, it will be having a refresh for a new product.

Today however, the online Apple Store has gone down globally with neither. We're not expecting any new products this early (the next one will most likely be the iPhone 5 in September/October), and instead of going to the holding page, we're faced with time out messages from our respective browsers.

Of course, this leads to another conclusion; could the largest tech company in the world have been hacked? Has the store been taken down because Anonymous, LulzSec or some other self-titled group of hacktivists have?targeted?Apple?

At present, nothing is coming out of Cupertino in relation to the downtime. Needless to say, we're currently trying to speak to our contacts to see exactly what's going on... Stay tuned.

Tags: Apple Online Phones Tablets Apple Store mac

Apple Store down... hacked? originally appeared on http://www.pocket-lint.com on Wed, 17 Aug 2011 15:24:00 +0100